Lawn Maintenance

West Michigan Lawn Care – The Crabgrass Guarantee

February 22nd, 2024 by Tuff Turf Molebusters

Timing Is Everything:

Make sure to apply a crabgrass pre-emergent before it’s too late! The optimal window for this in West Michigan is usually between March and May. Our first lawn care application includes this treatment along with fertilizer and general weed control. Additionally, if crabgrass pops up later, we’ll spot-treat it throughout the season for FREE! You can even take advantage of our free service calls if you’re on the full 6 application program. Service calls can be for both crabgrass and general weeds!

Remember, the key to our crabgrass guarantee is a timely pre-emergent application. Let’s strive for a crabgrass-free year together!

 

 

 

 

 

Like us on Facebook!

https://www.facebook.com/tuffturfmolebusters/

Tuff Turf's Main Logo.

 

 

 

 

A Grand Rapids Michigan Lawn Care company based in Byron Center, Michigan. Tuff Turf offers a variety of services (ranging from Lawn Care, Pest Control and Bug Control) to the following cities in Michigan:

Grand Rapids, Byron Center, Kentwood, Grandville, Jenison, Hudsonville, Holland, Grand Haven, Rockford, Cascade, Kalamazoo

 


West Michigan Lawn Care and Bug Control – Why It’s Critical To Do Both

February 14th, 2024 by Tuff Turf Molebusters

Importance of Lawn Care:

*Environmental Benefits: Lawns contribute to cleaner air, soil conservation, and water filtration.

*Aesthetic Appeal: Well-manicured lawns enhance property value and provide recreational spaces.

*Mental Health: Green spaces promote stress reduction and family bonding.

 

Significance of Bug Control:

*Protecting Plant Health: Pest infestations and disease transmission threaten lawn vitality.

*Preventing Human Health Risks: Insects can cause allergies, bites, and indoor intrusion.

*Preserving Biodiversity: Integrated Pest Management balances pest control with conservation efforts.

 

Lawn care and bug control are intertwined. By embracing the correct approach to lawn care and bug control, homeowners can create greener, healthier environments for both humans and nature. Let’s commit to nurturing our lawns to make your yard the most enjoyable part of your home!

 

 

Like us on Facebook!

https://www.facebook.com/tuffturfmolebusters/

Tuff Turf's Main Logo.

 

 

 

 

 

A Grand Rapids Michigan Lawn Care company based in Byron Center, Michigan. Tuff Turf offers a variety of services (ranging from Lawn Care, Pest Control and Bug Control) to the following cities in Michigan:

Grand Rapids, Byron Center, Kentwood, Grandville, Jenison, Hudsonville, Holland, Grand Haven, Rockford, Cascade, Kalamazoo

 


Grand Rapids Michigan Mole and Vole Control – What Do I Have?

February 7th, 2024 by Tuff Turf Molebusters

How Do I Know If I Have Moles or Voles?!

Mole activity vs vole activity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While both moles and voles are small mammals that burrow underground, they show different signs of activity and behaviors. Recognizing these distinctions is crucial for effectively managing issues related to their presence, particularly in gardening, landscaping, and overall lawn care.

Mole Activity:

  • Signs include dirt piles, surface ridges, and trails that squish when you walk on them.
  • This activity is the result of moles excavating tunnels underground and pushing up soil to the surface.
  • Moles primarily feed on earth worms which is why permanent removal is not 100% guaranteed.
  • Their tunneling behavior is extensive, creating complex networks of tunnels underground.
  • Moles prefer moist, loose soil and are often found in gardens, fields, and woodland areas.
  • Their activity can be overwhelming in the Spring when snow begins to melt and Fall as temperatures cool down.

Vole Activity:

  • Signs include surface runways, gnaw marks on plants, and the presence of burrow entrances in grassy areas or under vegetation.
  • Voles primarily feed on plant material such as grasses, roots, seeds, and bulbs.
  • They create shallower tunnels compared to moles, often hidden beneath grass or vegetation.
  • In the grass, you’ll notice what looks like as if a garden hose had been laying on the yard.
  • Voles inhabit various environments including grasslands, meadows, and orchards.
  • Like moles, their activity can be overwhelming in the Spring when snow begins to melt and Fall as temperatures cool down.

 

Like us on Facebook!

https://www.facebook.com/tuffturfmolebusters/

Tuff Turf's Main Logo.

 

 

 

 

 

A Grand Rapids Michigan Lawn Care company based in Byron Center, Michigan. Tuff Turf offers a variety of services (ranging from Lawn Care, Pest Control and Bug Control) to the following cities in Michigan:

Grand Rapids, Byron Center, Kentwood, Grandville, Jenison, Hudsonville, Holland, Grand Haven, Rockford, Cascade, Kalamazoo

 


Grand Rapids Michigan Lawn Care – What Is Winterizer Fertilizer?

February 2nd, 2024 by Tuff Turf Molebusters

A Tuff Turf lawn care tech applying fertilizer to a customers yard.

By winterizing your lawn, you’re not just saving yourself from a springtime scramble; you’re also investing in the long-term health and beauty of your yard. This isn’t just a one-time fix; it sets the stage for a resilient and vibrant lawn throughout the seasons.

Giving your lawn some extra care before winter sets in, you’re essentially fortifying its defenses against the harsh elements. This proactive approach pays off when the freezing temperatures and snow arrive, as your grass will have a head start in developing a robust root system.

This strong foundation not only ensures a quicker return to lush greenery in the spring but also acts as a natural deterrent to weeds, giving your lawn a better chance of maintaining its pristine appearance.

The benefits of winterization go beyond aesthetics. A well-prepared lawn is better equipped to withstand environmental stress, such as extreme weather conditions and soil compaction. This means less maintenance and more time for you to enjoy your outdoor space when the warmer months roll around.

So, if you’ve winterized your lawn, you’re not just checking a seasonal to-do off the list – you’re making a savvy investment in a healthier, more resilient, and visually appealing yard.

Like us on Facebook!

https://www.facebook.com/tuffturfmolebusters/

Tuff Turf's Main Logo.

 

 

 

 

 

A Grand Rapids Michigan Lawn Care company based in Byron Center, Michigan. Tuff Turf offers a variety of services (ranging from Lawn Care, Pest Control and Bug Control) to the following cities in Michigan:

Grand Rapids, Byron Center, Kentwood, Grandville, Jenison, Hudsonville, Holland, Grand Haven, Rockford, Cascade, Kalamazoo


Ground Control Lawn Care

February 23rd, 2021 by Tuff Turf Molebusters

We are honored to be recommended by Dan Jelens of Grounds Control Lawn Care as he steps in to retirement.  We wish Dan the best!


MSU Irrigation Tips

July 17th, 2020 by Tuff Turf Molebusters

Helping your lawn during the heat

July 17th, 2020 by Tuff Turf Molebusters

Sprinkling in the Summer

August 2nd, 2019 by Tuff Turf Molebusters
For season grass, summer in Michigan is the worst time of the year.  Remember the heat wave 2 weeks ago with the 90 degree temperatures, high humidity, and even nights that were still 80 degrees at 10:00 PM?  Not only were we uncomfortable, but our lawns were too!  Diseases that attack grass love the heat, humidity, and grass that is under heat stress.  While we cannot control the temperature, there are a few things that you can control, like:
 
Sprinkling

If you have an underground system, avoid sprinkling in the middle of the night.  You should water in the morning for about 15 minutes per zone with rotor heads and 2 minutes per zone with misters.  Water after 6:00 AM so that your lawn is not wet while it is dark.   When temperatures are above 80 degrees, sprinkle again in the afternoon to cool the lawn.  If you are watering in the heat of the day, make sure to water long enough to compensate for evaporation from the sun and wind.  For zones with rotor heads, water for 5 – 10 minutes and 2 minutes for the misters.  This will vary depending on soil profile, type of grass, amount of sun, and the amount of wind you receive.

I realize that underground sprinkling is a nice luxury and not everybody can afford it.  However, in today’s technological world, the lack of an underground sprinkler system is not really an excuse to avoid sprinkling when you are not home.  Amazon has everything you need to make your own “above ground sprinkling system”.  For less than $60 you can buy a digital timer that attaches to your spigot and has up to 4 connections for garden hoses that can be programmed to run at different times.  All you have to do is set out 4 sprinklers in your lawn.  You can even buy timers that have WiFi so you can control the timer with an app.  You would want to move the hoses every couple of days to avoid killing the grass under it.  I have seen many homes with nice systems using garden hoses, and you don’t have to blow them out in the fall!


How high should I cut my grass in the summer?

August 2nd, 2019 by Tuff Turf Molebusters
Mowing
Mowing the grass too low is the biggest mistake we see people make.  No matter how many times we recommend mowing at the highest setting during the middle of the summer, many people still mow the grass too short.  I have heard that mowing higher means mowing more frequently.  This is completely wrong, in fact the opposite is true.  The rule of thumb is to never cut off more than 1/3 of the blade of grass at one time.  If you apply the 1/3 rule and always let your grass grow long enough to cut 1/3 off, you can see in the chart below that raising the mowing height from 2″ to 4″ also doubles the number of days between mowings.
I realize that letting your grass get 6″ high before mowing is long and covers your shoes when you walk through it.  It looks like it needs to be mowed when you just finished mowing.  However, longer grass will remain green longer in the heat, have less weeds, and less pressure from diseases.  Keep in mind that this is for a short time period when we are in the middle of summer and have temperatures above 80 every day.
Besides for appearance, lawns are cut too short because most home-owner mowers can’t mow higher than 3″.  The small, mowing only companies don’t understand the agronomics of mowing high, and certainly don’t like to be told how to do their job when asked to raise their mower.  We just witnessed this last week at a turf tour where a MSU professor asked a group of Grand Rapids lawn care professionals how high to mow in the summer.  All the fertilizing companies said 3.5″ – 4″, while the companies that only mow said 2.5″ – 3″.
The depth of the roots of grass are a direct proportion to the height it is mowed

Summer Sprinkling

June 24th, 2019 by Tuff Turf Molebusters
  • Water twice a day when the temperature is above 80 degrees.  If you have underground sprinklers, set the rotary heads for 20 minutes a zone and the misters for 8 minutes at 5:00 AM and 1:00 PM. I have heard the argument to not water in the heat of the day because you lose it to evaporation.  Remember, your lawn is living and breathing.  You cool down with a glass of water.  We make sure our pets have plenty to drink.  Why would you not want to cool down the grass?
  • Avoid watering late in the evening.  You want to give your lawn time to dry before the sun goes down.  If the lawn stays wet all night you are only inviting fungus and disease.  Now, before I get flooded with emails from people without a sprinkler system, I should state that watering in the evening is still better than not watering at all.
  • Avoid too much water.  I have also heard the argument to water deep and infrequently to make the roots go deeper.  This argument is not based on science.  The biological make up of cool season grass is that the roots grow deep when temperatures are 55 degrees to 70 degrees.  That is whey the grass grows so fast in the spring, and also looks great in the fall.  The roots are going to be more shallow as temperatures climb above 75 degrees, so don’t waste water trying to fight nature.  A glass of water that is full cannot hold any more water, despite how long it is left under the faucet.  Soil that is too wet will lead to diseases of the grass.
  • If you have an irrigation system, make sure to watch the heads to make sure everything is firing on all cylinders. When conditions get dry, gaps in coverage become obvious and green and brown circles indicative of poor irrigation coverage become obvious.
  • Kevin Frank from MSU made a great video on watering.  Click here to see it.